Urban Flowers, Concrete Plains

Urban Flowers, Concrete Plains

"Urban Flowers, Concrete Plains" takes up where Jerry Harp's Creature (Salt Publishing, 2003) left off. These are the poems of the Creature, wandering through the world, seeking meaning he fears he'll never find. These poems experiment with various language and mental states, as well as a variety of poetic forms.

Boulevard No. 94

Boulevard No. 94

This issue features new work by Zeina Hashem Beck, Diana M. Chien, Jerry Harp, Clarence Major, Shara McCallum, Joyce Carol Oates, Kevin Prufer, Mark Rudman, Anis Shivani, and many more writers, both award-winning and emerging. Also: surrealistic and enchanting cover art by Rafal Olbinski, Josuak Idaszak's winning 2015 Fiction Contest story, and a symposium on technology within writing.

Utopia: Second Edition

Utopia: Second Edition

Saint Thomas More’s Utopia is one of the most important works of European humanism and serves as a key text in survey courses on Western intellectual history, the Renaissance, political theory, and many other subjects. Preeminent More scholar Clarence H. Miller does justice to the full range of More’s rhetoric in this masterful translation. In a new afterword to this edition, Jerry Harp contextualizes More’s life and Utopia within the wider frames of European humanism and the Renaissance.

For Us, What Music?: The Life and Poetry of Donald Justice

For Us, What Music?: The Life and Poetry of Donald Justice

Because Jerry Harp was Justice’s student, his personal knowledge of his subject—combined with his deep understanding of Justice’s oeuvre—works to remarkable advantage in For Us, What Music? Harp reads with keen intelligence, placing each poem within the precise historical moment it was written and locating it in the context of the literary tradition within which Justice worked.

Constant Motion: Ongian Hermeneutics and the Shifting Ground of Early Modern Understanding

Constant Motion: Ongian Hermeneutics and the Shifting Ground of Early Modern Understanding

"Constant Motion" complicates the idea that European consciousness has shifted, from the ancient world to the modern era, from an oral/aural to a largely visualist mode. While not denying the reality of a macro-level shift in the tradition of the schools to a metaphor of knowing as seeing clearly and distinctly, Harp emphasizes that acts of knowing are, like politics, always local.

A Poetry Criticism Reader

A Poetry Criticism Reader

A timely and informative collection, A Poetry Criticism Reader brings together eleven essays and reviews that constitute some of the best and most illuminating poetry criticism from the past decade.In his introduction to the book, editor-poet Jerry Harp gives an overview of poetry criticism and its pluralistic traditions after the high modernist years of T. S. Eliot. In the essays that follow, esteemed critics and poets explore varied aspects of poetics, make aesthetic statements, relate to postmodernism with its array of meanings, and examine particular poets and poems. 

Creature

Creature

This collection engages with traditional forms and carries out various kinds of experimentation centering on the physical meaning of life. The poems confront issues of cognitive, spiritual and erotic experience, and address longing and desire in the material world. The Creature yearns for new language in which we can all more truly live.

Gatherings

Gatherings

Poetry. "These new poems are formally brilliant, playfully colloquial, and often very moving. Away from the fads and short-lived literary movements, Jerry Harp is at once technically masterful and deeply thoughtful" -- Kevin Prufer. Jerry Harp is the co-winner of the 2004 Robert McGovern Publication Prize.